Menu

CENTURY: A NEW WORLD

Reviewed by Herb Levy

CENTURY: A NEW WORLD (Plan B Games, 2 to 4 players, ages 8 and up, 30-45 minutes; $39.99)

 

Not that long ago, Emerson Matsuuchi came up with a design called https://tffa.org/businessplan/uk-best-essays-review/70/ https://fotofest.org/solving/thesis-topic-for-architecture-in-india/5/ source url format for science paper research essay help similar a la viagra cialis can be used for women here viagra junk mail essay on pashupatinath thesis translation bengali narritive essay example an essay about panda https://www.medimobile.com/erectile/viagra-vicksburg/92/ cialis quantity limit https://dsaj.org/buyingmg/elevated-tsh-on-synthroid/200/ free essays about martin luther king jr http://go.culinaryinstitute.edu/example-of-narrative-essay-conclusion/ see url hire a writer for blog essay true friendship hindi cialis pancreatitis machiavelli essay ideas best combination with viagra https://heystamford.com/writing/business-statistics-assignment-help/8/ research design in thesis pdf go here futility war essay psychology case study examples free school essays viagra efectos secundarios yahoo drug interactions for cialis Century: Spice Road (featured in the Fall 2017 Gamers Alliance Report) and it was both a critical and commercial success! Some designers might have been content to rest on their laurels but that wasn’t all Matsuuchi had up his sleeve. He envisioned this as the first game in a trilogy of games. And now, following Century: Eastern Wonders, comes the third game in the set: Century: A New World.

In Century: A New World, the scene has shifted from the Spice Road to the Americas, where players will be using workers, rather than cards, to do the actions necessary to be the most successful merchant (as judged by amassing Victory Points). (The game can be mixed with the two previous releases in the series. In this review, however, the focus is on the New World game itself.)

The board is modular and consists of four square pieces divided into “locations”. A1, B1 and C1 are placed with your choice of D1, E1 or F1 finishing the large square. Four “Fort locations” will be found at the top of the board and Bonus tiles are mixed with a number of them, at random, placed face up in the specified spots. (Extra tiles are removed from play.) The Point card deck is shuffled and one card placed above each of the Fort spaces. 

10 Exploration tiles are shuffled and put, face down, on their marked spaces. Every player gets their own player board and 12 “settlers” (meeples) in their chosen color.  Six of these settlers begin on the board with the rest held in reserve. As with previous games in the series, cubes in yellow, red, green and brown are placed in bowls near the play area. The first player (randomly chosen) begins the game with 3 yellow cubes with the second and third players getting 4 yellow and the fourth player getting 3 yellows and 1 red. (As in other games, there is a limit of 10 cubes that may be held at the end of any turn.)

On a turn, the active player may move his/her settlers to any location on the board. Each one shows how many settlers need to be there to activate the action available. Some locations will give you more cubes, others will allow you to upgrade cubes in your possession to those more valuable or trade one type of cube(s) for others. When you have the right assortment of cubes, you may purchase Point cards by going to the appropriate Fort location.

Fort locations demand 1 to 3 settlers. You may buy the Point card there by handing in the needed cubes to supply. You may also claim a Bonus tile there and add it to your board. In fact, you have the option of buying the Point card AND taking the Bonus tile or just one OR the other. You need not do both! (Bonus tiles when taken are NOT replenished. When a stack is gone, it’s gone!) Both Point cards and Bonus tiles offer benefits.

In addition to Victory Points, Point cards also display an icon and a “power” such as giving a “settler discount” in a location (that is, needing fewer settlers to activate that space) showing the icon displayed, gaining a cube when you visit a matching location, liberating settlers in your reserve so they may be used for placement and allowing you to take an exploration tile from the board. (Exploration tiles not only give a one time benefit such as Victory Points or additional cubes but, when taken off the board, open up that location so it is now available for ALL players to use.) In similar fashion, Bonus tiles offer benefits that pay off, at the end of the game, by awarding Victory Points for icons, matching sets of icons and the number of settlers you have that are NOT in reserve. But there is only room for 3 Bonus tiles on your board so choose wisely. 

There will come a time when players either cannot or do not want to place settlers.  Then they “rest” and gather up all of their pieces from the board (the counterpart to gathering up your cards in Spice Road). That is the entire turn but, of course, they are poised to pursue new actions when their turn comes around again.

Unlike most worker placement games where a space is no longer available once occupied, this is not the case here. Any player may occupy an already taken location by spending one more settler than those already there. (Coal Baron, by Wolfgang Kramer and Michael Kiesling, featured in the Summer 2014 GA Report, uses a similar mechanism.)

The game ends when a player has purchased 8 Point cards. That round is finished so all have an equal number of turns. At that point, the player who has amassed the most Victory Points in Point cards, Bonus tiles, Exploration tiles and points gathered from non-yellow cubes left on their board (at the exchange rate of 1 VP per cube) wins! Tied? Then the last tied player to take a turn gets the edge.

The modular board layout of the game helps keep play fresh as different locations can be added and removed each time.  These modular pieces are two-sided (for use with other games in the series) and are of the same thickness as the player boards. (They are perfectly functional but a thicker board might have been better.)  Card quality is, as in the other releases, quite good.  The meeples used in the game are much smaller than depicted in the photo above, maybe the smallest meeples we’ve ever seen used in a game! Of course, you don’t want to overcrowd the board but still… 

Game play follows the successful flow of the original game with cards powering the action replaced by worker placement. Set collection adds another layer of strategy augmented with ties to those Bonus tiles. Since you cannot have more than 3 Bonus tiles and, once taken, they cannot be jettisoned or switched, deciding which Point card icons you want to collect becomes very important.  Your choice of icon(s) can also put you in direct competition with other players looking for the same ones! When to pick up a Bonus tile can be a question of timing. Too soon, and you may find yourself saddled with a Bonus unable to generate points; too late and there may be no Bonus tile to get!

Century: A New World is a new variation on the Century game group building upon the success of the original. For gamers who enjoy worker placement, for gamers who enjoy set collection, this is a game for you. For the rest of us who long for a twist to the original Century game, this is a new world ready and ripe for your exploration and enjoyment. – – – – – – – – – – – – – Herb Levy


Have feedback? We’d love to hear from you.


Have a comment?

 

Other Fall 2019 GA Report articles

 

18XX and the 1822 Family of Games by Eric Brosius In 2016, designer Simon Cutforth’s game 1822 was released.  1822 belongs to the “18XX family” of railroad games, which began ...
Read More
Reviewed by Herb Levy CARAVAN (Rio Grande Games, 2 to 4 players, ages 13 and up, 45 minutes; $49.95) Trade is the lifeblood of civilization and that was certainly true ...
Read More
Reviewed by Herb Levy CENTURY: A NEW WORLD (Plan B Games, 2 to 4 players, ages 8 and up, 30-45 minutes; $39.99) Not that long ago, Emerson Matsuuchi came up ...
Read More
[Not only is Joe Huber a frequent contributor to the pages of Gamers Alliance Report, he is also a noted game designer. His latest, Caravan, is, in fact, featured this ...
Read More
Reviewed by Herb Levy ECOS: FIRST CONTINENT (Alderac Entertainment Group [AEG], 2 to 6 players, ages 14 and up, 45-75 minutes; $59.99) The familiar formations of planet Earth had to ...
Read More
M-ESSEN AROUND As game players and devotees of the art of game design, many of us post about these passions, talk about them and, if we're lucky enough to have ...
Read More
THE GAMER'S BOOKSHELF: TORTURED CARDBOARD by Philip E. Orbanes (Permuted Press, softcover, 294 pages, $16.99) Tortured cardboard? That's the term used by Philip E. Orbanes that refers to the process ...
Read More
[With this issue looking ahead towards the upcoming Essen Game Fair in Germany, Gamers Alliance contributor Chris Wray looks back, now that the dust has settled, and offers his views ...
Read More
Reviewed by Kevin Whitmore GLORANTHA: THE GODS WAR (Petersen Games, 3 to 4 players, ages 14 and up, 90-120 minutes; $129) Glorantha: The Gods War was launched on Kickstarter in ...
Read More
[Ragnar Brothers consists of three friends who share a passion for board games and board game designs: Steve and Phil Kendall  and Gary Dicken. Starting in the 1980s by recreating ...
Read More
Reviewed by Herb Levy IMHOTEP: THE DUEL (Kosmos, 2 players, ages 10 and up, 30 minutes; $19.95) Back in 2016, Phil Walker-Harding designed Imhotep: Builder of Egypt, a game set ...
Read More
Reviewed by Herb Levy LETTER JAM (Czech Games Edition, 2 to 6 players, ages 10 and up, 45 minutes; $19.95) In the world of word games, you have Scrabble, you ...
Read More
Reviewed by Herb Levy PARKS (Keymaster Games, 1 to 5 players, ages 10 and up, 30-60 minutes; $60) One of our national treasures is also our natural treasures: the national ...
Read More
Reviewed by Andrea "Liga" Ligabue RED ALERT: SPACE FLEET WARFARE (PSC Games, 2 to 6 players, ages 14 and up, 60-90 minutes; £99.95) Since the publishing of Battle Cry back ...
Read More
Reviewed by Herb Levy SAILING TOWARD OSIRIS (Daily Magic Games, 2 to 5 players, ages 12 and up, 60 minutes; $50) The Pharaoh has died. Now, his funeral barge will ...
Read More
Reviewed by Herb Levy SIERRA WEST (Board & Dice, 1 to 4 players, ages 14 and up, 40-60 minutes; $50) In the 1840s, the American West had a certain cachet: ...
Read More
Reviewed by Chris Kovac STAR WARS: OUTER RIM (Fantasy Flight Games, 1 to 4 players, ages 14 and up, 2 to 3 hours; $64.95) In this game, designed by Corey ...
Read More
Reviewed by Pevans THE ROMANS (Ragnar Brothers, 1 to 4 players, ages 14 and up, 90-150 minutes; £50) The title of this game designed by the Ragnar Brothers (Gary Dicken ...
Read More
Reviewed by Greg J. Schloesser   TINY TOWNS (Alderac Entertainment Group [AEG], 1- 6 players, ages 14 and up, 45-60 minutes; $39.99) Darwin was right:  the world really is a ...
Read More
Reviewed by Herb Levy VILLAGERS (Sinister Fish Games, 1 to 5 players, ages 10 and up, 30-60 minutes; £20) Life could be hard for folks living in the Middle Ages ...
Read More
Reviewed by Herb Levy WATERGATE (Capstone Games/Frosted Games, 2 players, ages 12 and up, 30-60 minutes; $35) In the June heat of 1972, in the midst of a presidential election ...
Read More
[For gamers like us, Essen, Germany is one of the vibrant hubs of the gaming world - and it's been that way for years! As this issue is a special ...
Read More
Reviewed by Herb Levy WINGSPAN (Stonemaier Games, 1 to 5 players, ages 10 and up, 40-70 minutes; $55) One of the glories of nature is the abundance of different species ...
Read More

 

No comments

Leave a Reply

If you enjoy games, then Gamers Alliance is right for you!